Food for Thought

Food for Thought

Declaration on the JCPOA
17.03.2017
 
Global Perspectives: Rapid Reactions to U.S. Election Results - Memos by Council of Councils Members
23.12.2016
Council of Councils members’ perspectives on the impact of the U.S. election results on global cooperation.
GRF is accepting applications for the Associate/Program Director position.
22.12.2016
The application deadline is March 1, 2017.
Globalization, European Union And Economic Integration - Ambassador (R) Bozkurt Aran
22.12.2016
GRF member Amb. (R) Bozkurt Aran’s evaluation note entitled "Globalization, European Union And Economic Integration" published by the Economic Policy Research Foundation of Turkey (TEPAV) on December 2016.
GRF Young Academics Policy Paper Series No.4 “The Russian-Turkish Rapprochement: Policy Options for Ankara and its Allies”
21.12.2016
The fourth policy paper of the GRF Young Academics Program, which was designed to provide a forum for accomplished young academics to discuss and debate long-term policy challenges, was published.
Migration as a Challenge to Regional Security - Ambassador (R) Ümit Pamir
17.11.2016
GRF member Amb. (R) Ümit Pamir’s background paper for the panel on “Migration as a Challenge to Regional Security” at the 9th Regional Conference of the Council of Councils (CoC), held in Berlin on October 30-November 1, 2016...
The Referendum Heralds a New Europe - Ambassador (R) Ünal Çeviköz
07.10.2016
GRF Member, Ambassador (R) Ünal Çeviközʼs article entitled "The Referendum Heralds a New Europe" originally published in Turkish, in “Hürriyet”, on June 26, 2016.
EUʼs Crisis or the Supranational Governance Utopia - Ambassador (R) Özdem Sanberk
15.08.2016
GRF Member, Ambassador (R) Özdem Sanberkʼs article entitled "EUʼs Crisis or the Supranational Governance Utopia" originally published in Turkish, in “Analist”, no.64, June 2016.
GRF Young Academics Policy Paper Series No.3 - “Turkeyʼs Foreign Policy Towards China, Analysis and Recommendations for Improvement”
28.07.2016
The third policy paper of the GRF Young Academics Program, which was designed to provide a forum for accomplished young academics to discuss and debate long-term policy challenges, was published. The paper entitled “Turkeyʼs Foreign Policy Towards China, Analysis and Recommendations for Improvement” is authored by Dr. Altay Atlı.
EU Energy Policy: Sustained by Fragile Solidarity, Indispensable for Eurasian Security - Memduh Karakullukçu
12.07.2016
Please click to read GRF Vice-Chairman and President Memduh Karakullukçu’s article entitled “EU Energy Policy: Sustained by Fragile Solidarity, Indispensable for Eurasian Security”, originally published in the Center for Complex Operationsʼ journal PRISM, Volume 6, No. 2, "European Security in the 21st Century."
GRF Board Member Prof. İlter Turan Elected President of the International Political Science Association (IPSA)
11.07.2016
GRF Board Member Prof. İlter Turan was elected President of the International Political Science Association (IPSA) for 2016-2018 following the unanimous decision of the IPSA Council on July 26, 2016.
GRF Board Member Prof. Gülsün Sağlamer Became the First President of European Women Rectors Association (EWORA)
10.07.2016
GRF Board Member Prof. Gülsün Sağlamer becomes the first President of European Women Rectors Association (EWORA). EWORA was established on December 2015, with the initiative of Prof. Sağlamer and six other rectors from the European Women Rectors Platform.
GRF Member Prof. Orhan Güvenen Recieved Award from the Academy of Transdisciplinary Learning & Advanced Studies
17.06.2016
GRF Member Prof. Orhan Güvenen, Former Undersecretary of the State Planning Organization (DPT) and Professor of Econometrics at Bilkent University, was awarded with the Ramamoorthy & Yeh Transdisciplinary Distinguished Achievement Award by the Academy of Transdisciplinary Learning & Advanced Studies.
“The Mashriq Crisis: Containing Waves of Instability” Meeting Report
17.06.2016
Meeting report of GRF and the Institute for Strategic Dialogue (ISD)’s joint meeting entitled “The Mashriq Crisis: Containing Waves of Instability”, held in Istanbul on February 22-23, 2016.
GRF – CFR Council of Councils 8th Regional Meeting Rapporteurs’ Report -
17.03.2016
Please click here to read the rapporteurs’ report of the Council of Councils 8th Regional Meeting held in Istanbul on October 4-6, 2015.
GRF Young Academics Policy Paper Series No.2 - “Pipeline Partners: Expanding and Securing Iraqʼs Future Oil Exports”
29.09.2015
The second policy paper of the GRF Young Academics Program, which is designed to provide a forum for accomplished young academics to discuss and debate long-term policy challenges, was published. The paper entitled “Pipeline Partners: Expanding and Securing Iraqʼs Future Oil Exports” is authored by Dr. John V. Bowlus. Please click here to read the paper.
GRF – Club of Three “Working Session on Turkey and Europe” Meeting Report -
13.08.2015
GRF and the Institute for Strategic Dialogue (ISD)’s Club of Three initiative issued a report on the “Working Session on Turkey and Europe”, organized on June 26-27, 2015, in Istanbul. The meeting was held with the participation of several GRF members as well as men and women of influence in the fields of politics, media, academia and business from the UK, France and Germany. With four sessions, the meeting touched upon various issues of common concern for the UK, France, Germany and Turkey including regional security, energy cooperation, elections in Turkey and Europe, and global economic governance.
GRF Founding Member Dr. Fatih Birol was appointed as the next Executive Director of the International Energy Agency (IEA)
28.07.2015
GRF Chairman Mr. Rahmi Koç was awarded the French “Légion d’Honneur”
14.07.2015
On June 9, 2015, in a ceremony held at the Palais de France, GRF Chairman Mr. Rahmi Koç was awarded, by the Ambassador of France to Turkey His Excellency Ambassador Laurent Bili, the title “Officier dans l’Ordre National de la Légion d’Honneur”.
Council of Councils’ (CoC) Meeting on Crisis in Global Governance and International Cooperation Report Card Launch
13.05.2015
GRF Security Task Force Report entitled "Turkey in a Changing Global and Regional Security Environment: Some Observations and Recommendations" has been published
09.04.2015
Please click to read the report.
Launch Meetings of GRF Security Task Force Report entitled “Turkey in a Changing Global and Regional Security Environment: Some Observations and Recommendations”
07.04.2015
GRF-ISD “Club of Three Plenary of Turkey and its Neighbours” Meeting Report
26.02.2015
GRF and the Institute for Strategic Dialogue (ISD) issued a report on the “Club of Three Plenary Meeting on Turkey and its Neigbours”, organized on December 5, 2014 at Quai D’Orsay, Paris. The meeting was held with the participation of several GRF members as well as men and women of influence in the fields of politics, media, arts and business from the UK, France and Germany. With three sessions, the meeting touched upon various issues of common concern for the UK, France, Germany and Turkey including regional security, investment and growth, as well as migration.
GRF Founding Member Dr. Fatih Birol was appointed as the next Executive Director of the International Energy Agency (IEA)
25.02.2015
From GRF Members; Dr. Fatih Birol was appointed as the next Executive Director of the International Energy Agency (IEA).
Managing the Interaction between Islam and Democracy - Özdem Sanberk
23.01.2015
At the root of the problems being faced today in the region and all over the world, lies the decline of multinational empires in the last century. The Ottoman and Austro-Hungarian empires dismantled at the end of World War I, the Russian Empire in 1917, the French and British Colonial Empires at the end of World War II, and the Russian Empire in 1991. Each of these collapses has created immense geo-political earthquakes and with the mass migrations caused, has brought to surface ancient religious, sectarian and identity-related feelings of rancor and hatred, deeply rooted political and economic disagreements, ongoing land claims, unsettled issues of greed and tension, and deadly conflicts.
Technology, Democracy and Rights - Speech Delivered by GRF Vice-Chairman and President Mr. Memduh Karakullukçu at 4th Asian Forum on Global Governance
04.12.2014
GRF Young Academics Policy Paper Series No.1 - “Turkey in the Eurasian Energy Game”
12.11.2014
First policy paper of the GRF Young Academics Program, which is designed to provide a forum for accomplished young academics to discuss and debate long-term policy challenges, was published. The paper entitled “Turkey in the Eurasian Energy Game” is authored by Onur Çobanlı, who is currently pursuing his doctoral studies at the Humboldt University Berlin. Click here to read the paper.
India Global Forum 2014 Participation
10.11.2014
Ceremony & Dinner for Mr. Jak Kamhi’s GRF Honorary Membership Award Guest Speaker: H.E. Hikmet Çetin
05.11.2014
GRF Board Member Mrs. Suzan Sabancı Dinçer has Received the “Order of Civil Merit” of the Kingdom of Spain
05.11.2014
From GRF members; Suzan Sabancı Dinçer, Chairman and Executive Board Member of Akbank, was given  the Order of Civil Merit (Orden del Mérito Civil) of the Kingdom of Spain by King Felipe VI of Spain for her contributions to Turkey-Spain relations and for her support to the cultural convergence. Under Sabancı Dinçer’s leadership, Akbank has sponsored the biggest Dali exhibition outside of Spain, and organized concerts, recitals and the Catalan Film Festival in cooperation with the Cervantes Institute. 
GRF Vice-Chairwoman Mrs. Hanzade Doğan Boyner was chosen as an “Individual Champion” for the Girl Effect Movement
31.10.2014
From GRF Members; Hanzade Doğan Boyner, Chairwoman of Doğan Online and Doğan Gazetecilik, was chosen as an “Individual Champion”  for the Girl Effect movement.
The New Vision of the "New Turkey" - Özdem Sanberk
30.10.2014
People of "New Turkey" will be able to preserve their historical and cultural richness only if the state refrains from interpreting and shaping religious beliefs of minorities and continues liberal reforms for individual rights and freedoms.
GRF Member Ambassador Ertuğrul Apakan Heads OSCE Special Monitoring Mission to Ukraine
30.06.2014
GRF Member Ambassador Ertuğrul Apakan Heads OSCE Special Monitoring Mission to Ukraine -
30.06.2014
GRF Member Ambassador Ertuğrul Apakan has been appointed as Chief Monitor of the OSCE (Organization for Security and Cooperation of Europe) Special Monitoring Mission to Ukraine. Mr. Mark Etherington (UK) and Mr. Alexander Hug (Switzerland) have been appointed as Deputy Chief Monitors of the Special Monitoring Mission.
GRF Member Prof. Selçuk Esenbel has Received the "Georg Forster Research Award" -
25.03.2014
From GRF members; Prof. Selçuk Esenbel, Professor of History at Boğaziçi University has received the “Georg Forster Research Award”.
GRF Vice President Memduh Karakullukcu’s Speech at the Observer Research Foundation
19.02.2014
GRF Member Prof. Orhan Güvenen has Received the "Gusi Peace Prize" -
28.01.2014
From GRF members; Prof. Orhan Güvenen, Professor of Econometrics at Bilkent University and Former Undersecretary of State Planning Organization has recently received the “Gusi Peace Prize”.
An Academy for Global Civics - Hakan Altınay
10.01.2014
In order to navigate our increasing interdependence, we need a mental map to help us decide what sort of a rapport we wish to have with billions of others with whom we share our planet and destinies, but not our citizenship. And for that we need forums.
Global Partnership Quests: New Contentious Dynamics in Trade and Prospects For Turkey in an Age of TPP and TTIP - Bozkurt Aran
07.01.2014
The brief looks at how the necessity to maintain and develop the current trading system has led to new quests, namely the Transpacific Partnership (TPP); and Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). Both of the initiatives are complementary and should be treated as integral parts of a coherent international strategy, spearheaded by the United States. Believing that as one of the emerging economies, the manner in which Turkey positions herself in the new era is crucial, the brief asks the following crucial questions: Is Turkey prepared to engage in a battle to be integrated in the quests for new partnerships initiatives by making the hard policy decisions required for the wide-ranging transformation? Or, will she be content with her newly acquired emerging country status? The answers to these questions will likely determine Turkey’s place in the emerging trade regime whose parameters will be set by the TPP and TTIP.
Launching Meeting of “Turkish Energy Strategy in the 21st Century: Weathering Uncertainties and Discontinuities” Report
23.11.2013
The Balkans and Turkey - Foreign Policy and Defence Research Group (DSA)
11.09.2013
1.  General Observations:
Geopolitical Earthquakes - Sönmez Köksal
07.03.2013
G-20: Some Ideas for the Russian Presidency and Beyond - Speech Delivered by Mr. Memduh Karakullukçu, Vice-Chairman and President of GRF - - -
27.02.2013
Global system problems concern the current human population in its entirety. However, as the global population is politically organized around sovereign states, understanding of global system problems and design for solutions need to be constructed by aligning the interests and priorities of the fragmented subsystems. Forcing structures or policies against national governments’ tendencies or mis-timing of otherwise politically agreeable initiatives will most probably be frustrated.
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15.02.2013
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Policy Understanding of Economic Globalization - Diana Mutz and Edward D. Mansfield - - -
03.02.2013
The percentage of Americans who think it would be best for the United States to stay out of world affairs is at an all-time high since World War II1. This isolationist trend in public opinion is happening at a time when few things are more inevitable than the rising tide of economic globalization. In a number of recent studies, we have explored the factors driving mass attitudes toward two key features of globalization, international trade and offshore outsourcing2. That the U.S. public is so ambivalent about globalization at the same time that the health of the U.S. economy remains heavily dependent on it makes it all the more urgent that the public and political leaders share an understanding of what is at stake.
A Light in the Forest: Brazil’s Fight to Save the Amazon and Climate-Change Diplomacy Jeff Tollefson
02.02.2013
The Inequality Challenge Uri Dadush and Kemal Derviş
01.02.2013
High levels of inequality have become a subject of intense debate, particularly in the United States, where inequality has risen sharply over the past 30 years. The rise in inequality in most advanced countries and in many developing countries should be analyzed in the context of other big changes that have affected the global economy over the past three decades. These trends include major technological advances, mostly related to information technology; globalization, which has accelerated growth in many developing nations; and the changing role of the state.
Broken BRICs: Why the Rest Stopped Rising - Ruchir Sharma - - -
11.01.2013
Over the past several years, the most talked-about trend in the global economy has been the so called rise of the rest, which saw the economies of many developing countries swiftly converging with those of their more developed peers. The primary engines behind this phenomenon were the four major emerging-market countries, known as the BRICs: Brazil, Russia, India, and China. The world was witnessing a once-in-a-lifetime shift, the argument went, in which the major players in the developing world were catching up to or even surpassing their counterparts in the developed world. These forecasts typically took the developing world’s high growth rates from the middle of the last decade and extended them straight into the future, juxtaposing them against predicted sluggish growth in the United States and other advanced industrial countries. Such exercises supposedly proved that, for example, China was on the verge of overtaking the United States as the world’s largest econo...
Turkey-USA Relations: Fragile Alliance to “Model Partnership” - Associate Prof. Füsun Türkmen
08.01.2013
Bucking Beijing: An Alternative U.S. China Policy - Aaron L. Friedberg - - -
05.12.2012
In contrast to its Cold War strategy of containment, Washington’s current approach to China is not the product of a deliberate planning process. It is nowhere codified in official documents. Indeed, it does not even have a name. Still, for the better part of two decades, the United States has pursued a broadly consistent two-pronged strategy combining engagement and balancing.
UK-Turkey Knowledge Partnership Discussion
04.10.2012
How India Stumbled: Can New Delhi Get Its Groove Back? - Pratap Bhanu Mehta   - - -
26.09.2012
When the United Progressive Alliance, a group of center-left parties led by the Indian National Congress, came to power for a second term in 2009, it seemed that India could do no wrong. The economy had sailed through the worst of the global economic recession with GDP growing at a fast seven percent annually and accelerating (it reached 10.4 percent in 2010). Inflation was low, officials were finally starting to take India’s social problems seriously, and politics in the world’s largest democracy were contentious but robust. The rest of the world was even looking to the country as a serious global power. “India is not simply emerging,” U.S. President Barack Obama told the Indian parliament in November 2010; “India has emerged.”
OECD Conference on Internationalisation for Job Creation and Economic Growth - Speech Delivered by Mr. Memduh Karakullukçu, Vice-Chairman and President of GRF - - -
12.08.2012
Our Hosts from SUNY and OECD,
Obama’s New Global Posture: The Logic of U.S. Foreign Deployments - Michele Flournoy and Janine Davidson - - -
08.08.2012
Tough economic times have often been met in the United States by calls for a more modest foreign policy. But despite the global economic downturn, in today’s interdependent world, retrenchment would be misguided. The United States’ ability to lead the international community is still invaluable and unmatched. Its economy is still by far the largest, most developed, and most dynamic in the world. Its military remains much more capable than any other. The United States’ network of alliances and partnerships ensures that the country rarely has to act alone. And its soft power reflects the sustained appeal of American values. The United States should not reduce its overseas engagement when it is in a position to actively shape the global environment to secure its interests.
Addressing the Turkish Dimension in Creating a Euro-Atlantic Security Community - Euro-Atlantic Security Initiative (EASI)  - - -
12.07.2012
Building a Euro-Atlantic Security Community has many dimensions, including the multiple and diverse sides of security—from its political-military aspects to economic, environmental, and energy security, as well as human security in the form of good governance and respect for the rights of individuals. Other dimensions involve the evolving role and significance of key actors. On that front, none  is more important than Turkey and the dramatic changes in its role in the Euro-Atlantic region. The Euro-Atlantic Security Initiative’s Working Group on Turkey, which brought together experts from Turkey and from elsewhere in the region, examined the new assertiveness in Turkish foreign policy, Ankara’s growing influence within its critical immediate neighborhood, and its evolving relationship with other key portions of the Euro-Atlantic region. The report that follows assesses each of these elements. It then recommends measures to be taken by the Turkish govern...
The Iran Crisis: Imperatives of Immediacy, Perils of Systemic Corrosion - Memduh Karakullukçu - - -
09.05.2012
Iran presents an immediate security challenge. The priority is to defuse or to push back the crisis with the available policy instruments.  Establishing reliable mechanisms of commitment and supervision to ensure that Iran does not and will not develop nuclear weapons motivates the policy discussions. The choice among and sequencing of diplomacy, sanctions, covert action and military options constitutes the core substantive response to the immediate security challenge.
NATO is Still Fit for the Job and Continuous Adaptation is the Right Call for It - Ümit Pamir - - -
21.03.2012
The international system is in flux. We have seen the end of the bipolar world order and the unipolar moment also seems to fade away. Geopolitics are back and we are witnessing the emergence of a multi-polar system. This in turn creates a more fluid and volatile international environment. Therefore, one of the main tasks for any major player in the international security field is to help overcome the complicated-than-ever challenges during this era of radical changes when the current security environment is characterized by uncertainty and unpredictability. Todayʼs security challenges exist in many forms and at several levels including national, regional and global. They are mostly interrelated. Some are military in character, others non-military and many of them are hybrid.
The Future of History: Can Liberal Democracy Survive the Decline of the Middle Class? - Francis Fukuyama - - -
16.03.2012
Something strange is going on in the world today. The global financial crisis that began in 2008 and the ongoing crisis of the euro are both products of the model of lightly regulated financial capitalism that emerged over the past three decades. Yet despite widespread anger at Wall Street bailouts, there has been no great upsurge of left-wing American populism in response. It is conceivable that the Occupy Wall Street movement will gain traction, but the most dynamic recent populist movement to date has been the rightwing Tea Party, whose main target is the regulatory state that seeks to protect ordinary people from financial speculators. Something similar is true in Europe as well, where the left is anemic and right-wing populist parties are on the move.
Syrian-Iraqi-Iranian Triangle to Leave Turkey on Slippery Slope - Sönmez Köksal - - -
10.01.2012
Is Indonesia Bound for the BRICs?: How Stalling Reform Could Hold Jakarta Back - Karen Brooks
16.12.2011
Indonesia is in the midst of a yearlong debut on the world stage. This past spring and summer, it hosted a series of high-profile summits, including for the Overseas Private Investment Corporation in May, the World Economic Forum on East Asia the same month, and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) in July. With each event, Indonesia received broad praise for its leadership and achievements. This coming-out party will culminate in November, when the country hosts the East Asia Summit, which U.S. President Barack Obama and world leaders from 17 other countries will attend. As attention turns to Indonesia, the time is ripe to assess whether Jakarta can live up to all the hype.
How to Save the Euro—and the EU: Reading Keynes in Brussels - Henry Farrell and John Quiggin
21.06.2011
The European Union is in danger of compounding its ongoing economic crisis with a political crisis of its own making. Over the last year, crises of confidence have hit the 17 eu members that in the years since 1998 have given up their own currencies to adopt the euro. For the first decade of this century, markets behaved as though the debt of peripheral eu countries, such as Greece and Ireland, was as safe as that of core eu countries, such as Germany. But when bond investors realized that Greece had been cooking its books and that Ireland’s fiscal posture was unsustainable, they ran for the door.
The Post-Washington Consensus: Development After the Crisis - Nancy Birdsall and Francis Fukuyama
06.05.2011
A G-Zero World: The New Economic Club Will Produce Conflict, Not Cooperation - Ian Bremmer and Nouriel Roubini
06.05.2011
Policy Paper From GRF Board Members
15.04.2011
Turkeyʼs Report On The Gaza Incident On 31 May 2010
26.03.2011
"Report on the Israeli Attack on the Humanitarian Aid Convoy to Gaza on 31 May 2010" prepared for the UN Panel of Inquiry by the Turkish National Commission of Inquiry was published on February 11th 2011. Ambassador Özdem Sanberk, GRF Founding Member and Board Member, is Turkeyʼs representative on the UN Panel. » Click here to read the full report.
Turkey Is Losing Hope of a Rapport with Israel - Ozdem Sanberk
25.03.2011
Can Turkey and Israel be friends? It is a question that will affect the future of the entire Middle East. For many years they were close allies but in the past four years there has been a downward slide. Although Israelis blame the government of Recep Tayyip Erdogan, for the best part of a decade he kept relations with Israel on a normal working basis. What exacerbated the downturn was the brutality shown by Israeli troops in Gaza in January 2009. Then came a calculated televised humiliation of Turkeyʼs ambassador in Tel Aviv a year ago. Then, to crown it all, on May 31 last year the Israeli Defence Forces attacked a flotilla of vessels carrying humanitarian aid to Gaza - whose cargo had been previously checked by the Turkish authorities - killing nine people on board and wounding many others. This was despite last-minute appeals from Turkey to Israel for moderation.
Irresponsible Stakeholders? The Difficulty of Integrating Rising Powers - Stewart Patrick
24.03.2011
A major strategic challenge for the United States in the coming decades will be integrating emerging powers into international institutions. The dramatic growth of Brazil, China, and India and the emergence of middle-tier economies such as Indonesia and Turkey is transforming the geopolitical landscape and testing the institutional foundations of the post World War II liberal order. The Obama administration promotes developing cooperative relations with emerging powers, believing that countries with a stake in world affairs will become responsible global actors. But the United States should be under no illusions about the ease of socializing rising nations. Emerging powers may be clamoring for greater global influence, but they often oppose the political and economic ground rules of the inherited Western liberal order, seek to transform existing multilateral arrangements, and shy away from assuming significant global responsibilities. Over the next ten years and beyond, the ...
The Digital Disruption: Connectivity and the Diffusion of Power - Eric Schmidt and Jared Cohen
23.03.2011
The advent and power of connection technologies-tools that connect people to vast amounts of information and to one another-will make the twenty-first century all about surprises. Governments will be caught off-guard when large numbers of their citizens, armed with virtually nothing but cell phones, take part in mini-rebellions that challenge their authority. For the media, reporting will increasingly become a collaborative enterprise between traditional news organizations and the quickly growing number of citizen journalists. And technology companies will find themselves outsmarted by their competition and surprised by consumers who have little loyalty and no patience. Today, more than 50 percent of the worldʼs population has access to some combination of cell phones (five billion users) and the Internet (two billion). These people communicate within and across borders, forming virtual communities that empower citizens at the expense of governments. New intermedia...
U.S. Aid to Pakistan: Time for a New Approach - Homi Kharas
22.03.2011
The desperate situation in Pakistan is heart-rending. The United States has offered significant assistance, pledging now $150 million. This support is welcome. It will be even more welcome if it forms the start of a new aid relationship between Pakistan and the United States, one that recognizes the value of both humanitarian and development aid. Such a fresh start should be based on two propositions: first, the hearts-and-minds of aid recipients will not be won over just by assistance to cope with natural disasters but rather by also helping long-term development; second, development assistance must be based on a significant, stable flow of resources. The first point is general to all countries. There is certainly more to a long, stable friendship than helping during times of natural disaster. Better progress on development beforehand can be the most powerful prevention to widespread economic damage after a disaster and people will remember the mechanisms already i...
GDP and Economic Policy - Roya Wolverson
21.03.2011
Introduction Economists who want to compare the living standards of one country to another or the wealth of one country over time often use gross domestic product (GDP). Designed to measure the value of a countryʼs production of goods and services, the metric has for decades provided a critical framework to guide policy decisions that affect peopleʼs living standards. But as issues such as the environment and wealth inequality gain political prominence, some economists argue GDP fails to account for important factors of societal wellbeing that are not directly tied to economic production, such as air and water quality, health, education, and leisure. According to this view, measuring only the goods and services produced by a country also does not reflect an economyʼs productivity, or how much society gains from each input of capital and labor. Others say there is no broader social measurement tool for policymakers to gauge improvements in living standards. But they add that policym...
Getting Energy Regulation Right - John P. Banks
20.03.2011
It has been said that governments do three things: tax, spend and regulate, and regulation is the least understood. While every industry is regulated to some degree, apart from those directly involved, most people arenʼt aware of the day-to-day complexity involved in developing and implementing an effective regulatory framework. Itʼs sort of like a referee at a sporting event - while important to the game, the best are the ones you never know are there. Regulation occupies a unique role. It is intended to guarantee a balance in meeting the goals and interests of government, consumers, and industry in an impartial, transparent and accountable manner. Governments want to ensure that their policy objectives are met. Consumers want to be assured that they are being provided a safe and reliable service or product at a fair price, while industry needs a rational and predictable set of rules allowing a reasonable return. This is a difficult balancing act, and usually wo...
Bigger Is Better: - The Case for a The Case for a Transatlantic Economic Union - Richard Rosecrance
19.03.2011
Throughout history, states have generally sought to get larger, usually through the use of force. In the 1970s and 1980s, however, countervailing trends briefly held sway. Smaller countries, such as Japan,West Germany, and the "Asian tigers," attained international prominence as they grew faster than giants such as the United States and the Soviet Union. These smaller countries what I have called "trading states" did not have expansionist territorial ambitions and did not try to project military power abroad.While the United States was tangled up in Vietnam and the Soviet Union in Afghanistan, trading states concentrated on gaining economic access to foreign territories, rather than political control. And they were quite successful. But eventually the trading state model ran into unexpected problems. Japanese growth stalled during the 1990s as U.S. growth and productivity surged. Many trading states were rocked by the Asian financial crisis of 1997-98, during which international inv...
And Justice for All - Gary Haugen and Victor Boutros
18.03.2011
For a poor person in the developing world, the struggle for human rights is not an abstract fight over political freedoms or over the prosecution of large-scale war crimes but a matter of daily survival. It is the struggle to avoid extortion or abuse by local police, the struggle against being forced into slavery or having land stolen, the struggle to avoid being thrown arbitrarily into an overcrowded, disease-ridden jail with little or no prospect of a fair trial. For women and children, it is the struggle not to be assaulted, raped, molested, or forced into the commercial sex trade. Efforts by the modern human rights movement over the last 60 years have contributed to the criminalization of such abuses in nearly every country. The problem for the poor, however, is that those laws are rarely enforced. Without functioning public justice systems to deliver the protections of the law to the poor, the legal reforms of the modern human rights movement rarely improve the lives of those w...
Coping With China’s Financial Power - Ken Miller
18.03.2011
China’s approach to economic development has turned the country into a lopsided giant, an export juggernaut with one huge financial arm. Following the reforms launched by Deng Xiaoping in 1979, Chinese businesses began using cheap labor and cheap capital to compete on the world market, with ever-increasing eªectiveness.Today, Beijing continues to subsidize exports heavily. It does so directly, through favorable loans to businesses and favorable exchange rates to foreign buyers of Chinese goods. And it does so indirectly, through what economists call “financial repression,” whereby the government imposes controls on the investment of Chinese citizens that allow it to funnel capital into Chinese businesses. The People’s Bank of China has gathered a good portion of the enormous trade profits and cash inflows that have resulted. At the end of 2009, it held $2.4 trillion worth of foreign exchange. This is the largest amount of foreign exchange owned by any ce...
Which Europe?: - The Future of the EU - Özdem Sanberk
17.03.2011
Ladies and Gentlemen,
U.S. Alliances in East Asia: Internal Challenges and External Threats - William Breer
16.03.2011
May 20 marks the 60th anniversary of the ratification of the U.S.-Japan alliance by Japan’s House of Representatives. While the alliance is a bilateral arrangement, it has had a significant impact on Asia as a whole and is regarded by other nations as a key part of the regional security structure. The following is a brief survey of the treatyʼs role in the maintenance of peace and stability in the Asia-Pacific. It also demonstrates that the tensions currently confronting the U.S.-Japan alliance are not unique, but in fact have been faced by various bilateral alliances in the region; some have been resolved successfully and some have not. Most experts believe that the series of alliances the United States created after World War II was one of the most astute and far-sighted acts of diplomacy in history. The alliance with Japan laid the foundation for reconciliation between two enemy nations and the groundwork for the reconstruction of a nation whose industrial power, infras...
Obamaʼs New Nuclear Policies: A Step in the Right Direction - Michael E. OʼHanlon
15.03.2011
With the overlapping events of recent weeks on the nuclear front—the signing of the START Follow-On Treaty and the conclusion of the Nuclear Posture Review—the Obama administration has made a significant and positive mark in dealing with one of the greatest threats to the planet. To say that it is significant, however, is not to say that it is historic. The administration needs to avoid overstating what it has accomplished. On the nuclear front, the signature feature of the new nuclear policies is their balance—caution and carefulness on the one hand, combined with meaningful but modest steps towards minimizing nuclear danger on the other. There is more conservatism and incrementalism in these policies than some administration officials, anxious to trumpet their accomplishments in dramatic terms, will want to acknowledge. As for the effects of the nuclear policies on "resetting" U.S.-Russia relations, or increasing pressure on Iran and North Korea as they pursu...
India’s Rise, America’s Interest The Fate of the U.S.-Indian Partnership - Evan A. Feigenbaum
14.03.2011
Until the late 1990s, the United States often ignored India, treating it as a regional power in South Asia with little global weight. India’s weak and protected economy gave it little influence in global markets, and its nonaligned foreign policy caused periodic tension with Washington.When the United States did concentrate on India, it too often fixated on India’s military rivalry with Pakistan. Today, however, India is dynamic and transforming. Starting in 1991, leaders in New Delhi—including Manmohan Singh, then India’s finance minister and now its prime minister—pursued policies of economic liberalization that opened the country to foreign investment and yielded rapid growth. India is now an important economic power, on track (according to Goldman Sachs and others) to become a top-five global economy by 2030. It is a player in global economic decisions as part of both the g-20 and the g-8 + 5 (the g-8 plus the five leading emerging economies) an...
Vicious Circle Of National Narratives - Özdem Sanberk
13.03.2011
From the Turkish Daily Radikal
From Hope to Audacity - Zbigniew Brzezinski
12.03.2011
Appraising Obamaʼs Foreign Policy
Searching For A Settlement In Southeastern Turkey -
11.03.2011
Are Davos Manʼs Days Numbered? - Raj M. Desai & James Raymond Vreeland
10.03.2011
At the top of the agenda at the annual World Economic Forum in Davos this week is global cooperation—to “rethink, redesign, and rebuild” the architecture of international organizations to address economic, social, and security challenges. Reading the summary of the agenda, one gets the feeling that the attendees—the heads of governments, the media, multinational corporations, and international organizations—may be feeling increasingly defensive these days. Of course, the knives have been out for Davos Man for some time, particularly since the subprime mortgage crisis and global financial crisis. But if last year’s meetings took place as confidence in markets collapsed, this year there is a feeling that trust in the basic institutions of global governance, and in the capacity of forums like Davos to set agendas, has reached a low point. The program urges global leaders to regain public trust, “not only to establish the legitimacy of t...
Three Keys to Understanding Japan’s New Diplomacy - Keike Iizuka
09.03.2011
Japan’s new Prime Minister, Yukio Hatoyama, made his diplomatic debut in late September with a trip to the United States, where he attended United Nations meetings in New York and the G-20 Summit in Pittsburgh. Only a week after taking office, he met with U.S. President Barack Obama as well as other foreign leaders such as Chinese President Hu Jintao and Russian President Dmitry Medvedev. Hatoyama is the leader of the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ), which on August 30 won a landslide victory in the Lower House election over the long-time ruling party, the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP). As a result, an historic change of government took place on September 16, when the Diet elected Hatoyama Prime Minister. Hatoyama became the new Prime Minister of Japan. During the 2009 election campaign, the DPJ’s campaign manifesto either challenged or refuted outright many of the LDPʼs policies. Among the changes sought by the DPJ is a new approach to the Japan-U.S. relationsh...
Iranʼs Ballistic Missile Program - Greg Bruno
01.06.2010
U.S. President Barack Obama cited the rising threat of Iranʼs ballistic missile program as a key driver in his decision to alter course on a Bush-era missile shield for Europe. Tehranʼs arsenal is now "capable of reaching Europe," the president said in September 2009. Less than two weeks after that assertion-and hours after world powers disclosed a secret uranium enrichment facility near Qom-Tehranʼs Revolutionary Guards staged a full weekend of test firings, blasting a series of medium- and short-range missiles in a show of military strength (NYT). Western defense analysts say the missiles tested have a range sufficient to reach Israel and U.S. bases in the Persian Gulf, while Iranian General Abdullah Araqi claimed that Iranʼs arsenal now has the ability to "hit any place from which a threat is posed to Iran." But many questions remain about Iranʼs ballistic missile program. Western analysts canʼt say for sure how far Iranian technology has advanced, and experts frequently questi...